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Medical Sciences Baccalaureate Program

Informatics for the 21st-Century Medical Professional

MEDS 3052C | 3 credit hours

Fall Semester | Syllabus (PDF)

TR 9:30 – 10:50 AM

Tiffany Grant | tiffany.grant@uc.edu | 513-558-9153 
Kristen Burgess | kristen.burgess@uc.edu | 513-558-3071  
Leslie Schick | leslie.schick@uc.edu | 513-558-4321


This course is designed for upper level undergraduates, graduate students, and aspiring and current medical professionals with an interest in research or informatics. Using lectures, discussions, hands-on exercises, and presentations from clinicians and researchers at UC, this course provides an orientation to informatics concepts, practices, and tools for the 21st century medical professional. 

Students will gain an understanding of the relationships between informatics, biomedicine, research, and libraries as well as practical application skills. Assessment for undergraduate students will be based on class attendance and participation, quizzes, final exam, and a research project. Assessment for graduate students will be based on class attendance and participation, quizzes, final exam, a research project, and a research paper.

 

Learning Objectives

Students will:

  • Define medical informatics and describe its applicability for their current and future careers
  • Develop research skills using key research and literature databases
  • Critically select and evaluate clinical research
  • Explain the importance of research data management and prepare a general research data management plan
  • Describe special topics in medical informatics

Textbook

H. Shortliffe, James J. Cimino (2006) Biomedical
Informatics: Computer Applications in Health Care
and Biomedicine
, 3rd edition, Springer, New York
Hardback ISBN: 978-0-387-28986-1

UC students have free access to the E-Book at the Health Sciences Library. Note: A new edition will be published October 2013. Students are advised to use the free, online version instead of purchasing the 2006, 3rd edition.

Additional reading assignments will be detailed in the Syllabus.

Researchers at Cincinnati Children’s