Today is Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018

Department of

University Health Services

News and Alerts

Health Advisory:  Hepatitis A Outbreak in Ohio

September 20, 2018

Please be aware that there is an ongoing hepatitis A outbreak in Ohio, with 44 cases in Hamilton County in the past 9 months.

Hepatitis A is a virus that causes severe liver inflammation, resulting in nausea, abdominal pain, fatigue and jaundice.  It is spread through food, water, and direct close contact with someone actively infected with the virus.
 
You can protect yourself by getting vaccinated - see your primary care provider for the two-shot series if you haven't already had it.  Students who have the UC Student Health Insurance are covered. Most plans cover preventative vaccines.  If you have a different health insurance provider, check with your plan to see if you are covered.  Good handwashing and universal contact precautions are always important!
 
See http://www.odh.ohio.gov/hepa for more details.

Kim L. Miller, MD
Executive Director, University Health Services
Adjunct Associate Professor of Medicine, Department of Family and Community Medicine
University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

Health Advisory:  Update Concerning Mumps on Campus

 
May 15, 2018

To All UC Students, Faculty & Staff:  

We would like to make sure that the UC community, especially those who have recently joined us for the summer session, are aware that mumps has been detected at UC. Since the first health advisory sent out in April, several additional probable mumps cases have been reported, which suggests that local transmission may have occurred.

If you have not yet done so, please check your immunization status for mumps. Confirm that you received at least two doses of MMR after your first birthday. If you did not, we recommend that you get vaccinated as soon as possible. People born before 1956 are considered naturally immune and do not require vaccination.

While most people have been immunized with two doses of MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine, nationally thousands of mumps cases occur every year and some vaccinated people still develop mumps, though usually a milder case.

Symptoms of mumps may include fever, headache, fatigue and swollen, tender salivary glands under the ears or jaw and on the cheeks. Symptoms typically appear two to four weeks after exposure. Most people with mumps make a full recovery after a few weeks. Return to school is allowed after five days of isolation.

Mumps is spread like many other viruses — via saliva or mucous from the mouth, nose or throat. An infected person can transmit the infection by coughing, sneezing, sharing items such as cups or beverages, intimate contact or by touching surfaces with unwashed hands. Keeping hands clean is one of the most important steps you can take to prevent spreading illness.

If you develop a fever and swelling at the cheeks, please contact your physician to make an appointment as soon as possible. Students should call University Health Services at 513-556-2564. Faculty and staff should call UC Employee Health at Holmes, 513-584-4457. When you arrive, please indicate your concern for mumps and ask for a mask.  

We will continue to keep the campus updated as new information or new recommendations become available. Thank you for your cooperation.

Kim L. Miller, MD
Executive Director, University Health Services
Adjunct Associate Professor of Medicine, Department of Family and Community Medicine
University of Cincinnati College of Medicine
 
Pronouns: she/her/hers
 
Phone:   513-556-6289
Fax:        513-556-1337

www.med.uc.edu/uhs
 
West Campus (UC Students)
Lindner Athletic Center, Suite 335
Cincinnati, OH  45221-0010
(513) 556-2564
 
Medical Campus (UC Employees & Students)
Holmes, Suite 4011
200 Albert Sabin Way
Cincinnati, OH  45267-0460
(513) 584-4457
 
 
Disease Fact Sheet: Mumps
 
What is mumps?
Mumps is an acute viral disease characterized by fever, swelling and tenderness of one or more of the salivary glands.
 
Who gets mumps?
Anyone who is not immune from either previous mumps infection or from vaccination can get mumps. Before the routine vaccination program was introduced in the United States, mumps was a common illness in infants, children, and young adults. Because most people have now been vaccinated, mumps is now a rare disease in the United States. Mumps is more common during winter and spring.
 
How is mumps spread?
Mumps is spread when an infected person coughs or sneezes and sends the mumps virus into the air. The virus can land in other people’s noses or throats when they breathe or put their fingers in their mouth or nose after handling an infected surface.
 
What are the symptoms of mumps?
Symptoms of mumps include fever, headache, and swelling and tenderness of one or more of the salivary glands located close to the jaw. The salivary gland most often affected is the parotid gland (located just below the front of the ear). Approximately one-third of infected people do not exhibit symptoms.
 
How soon after infection do symptoms occur?
The incubation period is usually 16 to 18 days, but may range from 12 to 25 days.
 
What complications have been associated with mumps?
Mumps can cause encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), meningitis (inflammation of the covering of the brain and spinal column), inflammation of the testicles or ovaries, inflammation of the pancreas, and deafness (usually permanent).
 
When and for how long is a person able to spread mumps?
Mumps is generally transmitted from about 3 days before symptoms appear to about 4 days after, although the virus has been isolated from saliva as early as 7 days before to as late as 11-14 days after onset of symptoms.
 
Does past infection with mumps make a person immune?
Yes. Immunity acquired after contracting the disease is usually permanent.
 
Is there a vaccine for mumps?
Yes. Mumps vaccine is given on or after a child's first birthday, and is administered in combination with measles and rubella vaccine. A second booster dose is recommended after four years of age. The MMR (measles mumps rubella) vaccine is highly effective and usually produces lifelong immunity against mumps.
 
What can be done to prevent the spread of mumps?
The single most effective control measure is maintaining the highest possible level of immunization in the community. Children with mumps should not attend school during their infectious period.

SOURCE: Ohio Department of Health Infectious Disease Control Manual

Tuberculosis

Do you know that every year there are 8-14 cases of active tuberculosis in Hamilton County?  Get the facts and learn what you can do to reduce your risk of this air-borne infection. See http://www.cdc.gov/tb/publications/factsheets/general/tb.pdf for important information about Tuberculosis from the CDC.  If you have any concerns about your risk for TB or wish to be tested, please call us!  Additional testing and information is available from the Hamilton County Health Department TB Control Unit, 513-946-7809 – check their website at http://www.hamiltoncountyhealth.org/services/for-businesses/programs/community-health-services-disease-prevention/tuberculosis/

Pertussis

What is pertussis?

Pertussis, or whooping cough, is a persistent cough illness. Anyone of any age can get pertussis.

What are the symptoms of pertussis?

The first symptoms of pertussis are similar to a cold. After a week or two, the cough worsens and begins to occur in sudden, uncontrollable bursts. Persons with pertussis may seem well between coughing spells. The coughing spells become less frequent over time, but may continue for several weeks or months until the lungs heal.

Vomiting can occur following coughing. Children, in particular, may make high-pitched whooping sounds when gasping for breath after coughing.

Is there a lab test for pertussis?

To test for pertussis, the nasal passage is swabbed. The material on the swab is then examined in the lab for the presence of pertussis bacteria. Only persons with symptoms of pertussis should be tested.

How is pertussis spread?

Pertussis bacteria are spread through droplets produced during coughing or sneezing. These droplets don’t travel very far through the air and usually only infect persons nearby.

When and for how long can a person spread pertussis?

Persons with pertussis can spread it to others in the first 3 weeks of coughing if not treated with antibiotics. After a person with pertussis has taken antibiotics for 5 days, he or she can no longer spread the disease.

Although the cough can last longer than 3 weeks, a person is no longer contagious after the third week.

How long should someone with pertussis stay home from child care, school, or work?

Persons with pertussis should stay home from child care, school, work, and other activities until they have finished 5 days of antibiotics, unless they have already been coughing for 3 or more weeks.

How can pertussis be prevented?

The best way to prevent pertussis is to be vaccinated. In addition to routine childhood immunizations, a pertussis vaccine booster shot is now recommended for adolescents and adults. Come to UHS to get this booster shot.

Persons who have completed some or all of the recommended vaccinations for pertussis may still get pertussis disease, but will generally have a milder illness.

More Tips!

        Wash your hands often

        Stay at home if you are ill

        When coughing, cover your mouth with a tissue or cough into your sleeve

Contact UHS if you develop pertussis-like symptoms or have been exposed to someone with pertussis.

University Health Services, Main Campus Location  513-556-2564

Pertussis Questions and Answers (PDF)

Don’t Let the Flu Get You

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Zika Virus


The Florida Department of Health has identified an area with local mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission (active Zika virus transmission) in Miami (http://www.cdc.gov/zika/intheus/florida-update.html). This alert applies to women of reproductive age and their partners who live in or traveled to this area after June 15, 2016. This is an ongoing investigation, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is rapidly learning more about the extent of active Zika virus transmission in Florida.  With the recommendations that follow, CDC is applying existing guidance to the occurrence of Zika virus transmission in this area of Florida.  As more information becomes available, we will update these recommendations.  

The virus is transmitted primarily through the bite of an infected mosquito, but can also be transmitted by a man to a woman through sexual transmission. The CDC recommends that pregnant women consider postponing travel to Zika-affected areas because of an association between Zika virus infections and certain birth defects.”
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Download: 
Ohio Department of Health (ODH) Virus Fact Sheet (PDF)

If you have any questions regarding Zika, please visit cdc.gov/zika/

 

Spring 2016 Mumps outbreaks

As of March 2016, there are three reported mumps outbreaks on university campuses, including two nearby in Indiana. All University of Cincinnati students are encouraged to check their vaccination status. If they have not been fully vaccinated for mumps (two doses of the MMR vaccine), they should come to the University Health Services to be fully vaccinated.

Mumps virus is the causative agent of mumps, a disease characterized by swelling of the parotid glands, salivary glands, and other epithelial tissues. Infection is accompanied by high morbidity (you feel real sick!). The symptoms of mumps are fever, headache, muscle aches, tiredness, loss of appetite, and swollen glands. Most people recover fully, but there is a rare chance of serious complications, such as deafness. The disease is still present even with availability of an effective vaccine.

Before the U.S. began vaccinating against mumps in 1967 [MMR - measles-mumps-rubella vaccine], there were about 186,000 cases reported each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Now, the number of cases ranges from a couple hundred to a couple thousand yearly. It is not uncommon for cases to spread in outbreaks on campuses, due to the close living quarters of students. In addition, recent misunderstandings about immunizations have increased the number of students who may not be protected. Please contact the University Health Services if you have any questions about the MMR vaccine or any concerns about symptoms consistent with mumps.

 
Mumps Questions and Answers (PDF)